Differences between Lithuania and Japan. By Ignas Naruševičius 8C

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Have you ever thought what kind of differences are between these two countries? Let’s take a look at two European and Asian countries, Lithuania and Japan. Both countries have their traditional food, music, and traditions. Also there is different weather in each region.

The food of Lithuania is mostly made of potatoes. Meanwhile, Japanese eat mostly seafood and rice, for example sushi is their traditional food. On the contrary Lithuanians (or many of them) hate fish and eat “Cepelinai” and “Šaltibarščiai”.

The weather in our country changes from -30 Celsius to +30 Celsius. In Japan there is similar weather like in Lithuania, but in some regions the weather can be much warmer.

Educational systems are very different between these two countries. Usually students in Lithuania have summer holidays for about three months. Meanwhile, Japanese children have only one month of holidays in summer.

The music in both countries mostly differs in instruments and rhythms. But some similarities can be found, for example Lithuanian “Kanklės” and Japanese “Koto”.

And the last but not least: traditions. Japanese have their tea ceremonies. Meanwhile Lithuanians bake black bread according to their own traditions. On the contrary to Lithuanians, Japanese  don’t eat black bread at all. Our main feast is Christmas. Meanwhile Japanese do not celebrate this holiday, on the other hand, they celebrate New Year’s Eve like us.

Comprehension check:

  1. What kind of food do Japanese eat the most?
  2. How long are summer holidays for Japanese kids?
  3. What kind of ceremonies do Japanese have?
  4. What is the traditional food of Lithuania?
  5. What feast is not celebrated in Japan?
  6. What is the traditional food of Japan?
  7. What Chinese New Year Promoting Event In Kobekind of food many Lithuanians hate?
  8. On which instruments some similarities can be found?
  9. Where does temperature change from -30 to +30 Celsius?
  10. What feast do  Japanese celebrate like us?

What do you think? Leave a reply:)

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